A Great Commission Context

“We must be global Christians with a global vision because our God is a global God.”
— John Stott

In both the design and strategy of our Lord Jesus, true discipleship is simply incomplete without a Great Commission context and passion.  At the end of the day, no follower of Jesus is the ‘end-user” of his or her discipleship.  But without a global life orientation, discipleship practices can subconsciously become religious avenues primarily pursued for greater self-understanding and quality of life.  With Jesus, the disciple-making of the original twelve, from calling to commission, was all about others.  When He first called them to follow, He promised they would be “fishers of men.”  And when He was ready to leave them, He charged them to “go into all the world.”  True discipleship, therefore, cannot be divorced from the Great Commission.  It is not just “learn from Me,” but it’s also “follow Me…” into all the world.

Yet the Great Commission could be characterized as the Great Omission in many discipleship models today.  Our challenge is to raise up a generation of global Christians – everyday disciples passionate to leverage time, talent, and treasure to see Jesus glorified among all peoples around the globe.  This requires the recovery of two missing jewels of discipleship: worldview and world vision.  Worldview is all about seeing life through the lens of Holy Scripture and aligning beliefs and behaviors accordingly.  World vision is seeing our lost world as Jesus does, being moved to compassion and action as He was.

To raise up a new generation of global Christians, we must root them not only in the Word and Ways of God, but also in His worldview and world vision.  As one student said through her tears during her summer missions debrief: This cross-cultural mission has helped me overcome my greatest obstacle…myself.”  True disciple-making is all about “others.”

 

Reflection Points

  1. How does following Jesus look like in the context of where He has planted you?
  2. How does cultivating a worldview and world vision change how you approach your prayer life? Your job/vocation?  Your Free time?
  3. Who are the “others” whom God has placed in your path?  What is Father God’s heart for them?  Spend some time praying for them, asking the Lord to reveal specific things you can pray for them.

[Randy Young has served many yeas as a senior pastor and mission mobilizer.  He is the founder and director of The Agora Group, training next generation leaders to impact global cultures.]